Archive for December, 2010

Bluetooth communication between BlueSMIRF and Ubuntu

A quick post on how to set up the Bluetooth communication between Ubuntu and a BlueSMIRF Modem.

My laptop was broken recently, and after getting a free new motherboard from the kind Sony people I reinstalled Ubuntu and tried to get all my software running again. Today I tried setting up the Bluetooth communication with my toy car’s BlueSMIRF (see previous posts) and  my laptop, and decided on documenting it. So here’s how to do it:

  1. (optional) It’s easiest if you can see what is happening on the BlueSMIRF side. Therefore, you’ll need a serial (TTL) to USB convertor like this one. Alternatively, if you have a Dwengo board (or similar), you can use that one by simly removing the PIC18F chip for a while:

    Now you can monitor the commands and data passing through the BlueSMIRF by opening “serial port terminal” (install it through the Ubuntu Software Center) on /dev/usbtty0 at the speed of your BlueSmirf (default 115200 baud)

    Details on the commands available are available in the Roving Networks Command datasheet.

  2. I didn’t get the default Ubuntu Bluetooth tool (the B in the taskbar) to play nice with the BlueSMIRF, so I installed “Bluetooth Manager” (BlueMan) through the Software Center.
  3. Power the BlueSMIRF, it should start blinking rapidly for about a minute. This means it is waiting for a connection. Once the rapid blinking stops, you can’t connect anymore!
  4. Click on the B in your taskbar of BlueMan, a window should open showing the Bluetooth devices in your environment. One of them should be FireFly (the BlueSMIRF). Right click on it an select “connect to SPP”:

    (the name in the screenshot is robot-719A instead of Firefly because I changed it earlier)
  5. Because this is the first time you connect to the BlueSMIRF, it needs to be paired. Therefore, Blueman will ask you the pass phrase. Enter “1234” (without quotes), this is the default passphrase of the BlueSMIRF.
  6. The bottom of the Blueman screen should now say “Serial port connected to /dev/rfcomm0”. Now you can open a serial connection to /dev/rfcomm0 using serial port manager (or from within a script) and start communicating 🙂
    The LED on the BlueSMIRF should turn green.

That’s it! Now the pairing is done, and you won’t need to enter the passphrase the next time you connect to the BlueSMIRF.

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    December 19, 2010 at 11:15 am Leave a comment


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